Catching the new and classic aircraft at the Paris Air Show – CNET

The Paris Air Show wasn’t just Boeing and Airbus, there were plenty of other aviation companies at Le Bourget Airport eager to show their aircraft. Military and commercial airplanes and helicopters were on display along with radical new aircraft designs and a few old favorites.

First up is the Mitsubishi Regional Jet or MRL. An attempt by Japan to gain a foothold in the regional airliner industry, the MRJ made its first flight last November. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

mitsubishi-mrj-pas-1

Mitsubishi’s regional jet rivals are Bombardier (based in Canada) and Embraer (based in Brazil). The aircraft will come in two versions: The MRJ70 will seat between 69 to 80 passengers and the MRJ90 will fit 81 to 92 passengers.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

mitsubishi-mrj-pas-2

The MRJ was painted in the colors of Japanese carrier All Nippon Airways, which has ordered 15 aircraft.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

mitsubishi-mrj-pas-3

The MRJ has a sleek, pointed nose.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

mitsubishi-mrj-paris-airshow

Depending on the variant the MRJ is powered by two Pratt & Whitney PW1215G or PW1217G engines. The typical cruising speed will be 447 knots — that’s 514 miles per hour or 828 km per hour.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

mitsubishi-mrj-paris-airshow-2

Deliveries to ANA are scheduled to start in 2020.  

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

interjet-sukhoi-pas

Parked nearby was a Sukhoi Superjet 100 in the attractive livery of Mexican low-cost carrier Interjet. Made by a subsidiary of the Russia-based United Aircraft Corporation, the Superjet first flew in 2008 and entered service in 2011. Made mostly for short to medium-range routes, it seats between 87 and 108 passengers.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

pas-1

A look over Le Bourget shows the wide variety of aircraft on display.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

cirrus-vision-jet-pas

Stashed away in a corner was a Cirrus Vision Jet, a unique single-engine private jet.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

eurofighter-typhoon-pas

The Eurofighter Typhoon is made by a division of Airbus. It currently flies with the air forces of several countries, including Spain, Germany, Italy and the UK.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

boeing-osprey-pas

One of the more curious aircraft on display was the Bell Boeing V-22 Opsrey. The tilt-rotor aircraft can take off/land and fly both like a helicopter and an airplane.  

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

boeing-apache-pas

The Boeing AH-64 Apache is an attack helicopter. First introduced in 1986, it still flies with the US Air Force.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

boeing-chinook

Boeing’s Chinook helicopter was right next door. The twin-rotor copter is mainly used for troop movements, supply, missions and disaster relief. A ramp in the back allows for the loading of heavy cargo. 

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

boeing-p-8-pas-2

The P-8 Poseidon is a military variant of Boeing’s commercial 737 airliner. The US Navy has flown it since 2013 for maritime patrol missions.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

kawasaki-p-1-pas

Kawasaki’s P-1 flies similar missions, but for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

c130-hercules-pas

Lockheed’s well-known C-130 heavy military transport also made an appearance. 

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

lockheed-lm-100j-pas

Lockheed’s 100J is the civilian version of the C-130 Hercules. It also has a rear ramp for loading heavy equipment.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

qatar-777-pas

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

pas-rainbow-propeller.jpg

I love this rainbow-painted propeller on this ATR 72 in the colors of new airline customer IndiGo. 

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

gulfstream-jets-pas

A lineup of sleek Gulfstrem private jets tempted visitors with a few million bucks to spare.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

concorde-paris-airshow-9

Also located at Le Bourget is the Musée de l’air et de l’espace or the Museum of Air and Space, which displays a wide variety of historic aircraft including two Concorde supersonic airliners. The Concorde on the left (registration F-WTSS) was the first Concorde built and the first one to fly on March 2, 1969. It remained a prototype and testing aircraft and never flew passengers. The Concorde on the right (registration F-BTSD) flew with Air France between 1978 and 2003.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

747-pas-1

Outside is a iconic (and dirty) Boeing 747-100, which flew with Air France between 1972 to 2003.

Photo by: Kent German/CNET

REVIEW

The most beautiful phone ever has one wildly annoying issue

The Samsung Galaxy S8’s fast speeds and fantastic curved screen make it a top phone for 2017, but the annoying fingerprint reader could sour your experience.

Hot Products

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *