Even GOP senators think Trump’s tweeting has gone too far – CNET

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His tweeting is not for turning.

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I have no idea whether President Donald Trump has ever contemplated cosmetic surgery.

His Thursday tweet on the subject, however, is moving even fellow Republicans to muse that the president’s Twitter account needs to be refigured and made, well, more presidential. What does that even mean anymore? 

Let’s start with the play by play. I’ll be as quick as I can.

Likely smarting at recent criticism from MSNBC morning show hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, the president struck back in a manner that many found undignified.

In two tweets on Thursday, he railed: “I heard poorly rated @Morning_Joe speaks badly of me (don’t watch anymore). Then how come low I.Q. Crazy Mika, along with Psycho Joe, came to Mar-a-Lago 3 nights in a row around New Year’s Eve, and insisted on joining me. She was bleeding badly from a face-lift. I said no!”

Some who read these tweets, or even heard about them, said no too. Unusually, some were even from his own party. 

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, for example, tweeted: “This has to stop — we all have a job — 3 branches of gov’t and media. We don’t have to get along, but we must show respect and civility.” She didn’t direct her tweet specifically at the president’s Twitter account.

Sen. Lindsay Graham of South Carolina tweeted more directly: “Mr. President, your tweet was beneath the office and represents what is wrong with American politics, not the greatness of America.”

Naturally, criticism didn’t just come from the Republican side. An MSNBC spokesman told me: “It’s a sad day for America when the president spends his time bullying, lying and spewing petty personal attacks instead of doing his job.” 

Brzezinski herself took to Twitter, with a little more subtlety than the president. She posted an image of a Cheerios box with the words: “Made For Little Hands.” There’s been a long-running stream of thought that the president’s hands aren’t as large as his personality. 

The White House didn’t respond to a request for comment. However, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told a Thursday press conference: “He’s not going to sit back and be attacked by the liberal media, Hollywood elites. When they hit him, he’s going to hit back.”

Some might wonder who is the bully and who is the bullied. It’s hard to see the president as a victim. He prefers to present himself as a strong man. Or even a strongman. 

Trump’s tweet targeted Brzezinski’s IQ, her sanity and her womanhood. It surely has echoes of his attitude toward then-Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly after she asked him about his own attitude toward women in the first Republican debate. Then, he referred to Kelly on Twitter as a “bimbo.” He even told CNN that she “had blood coming out of her wherever.”

At the core of all this is the true purpose of Trump’s Twitter account. Many might say it’s simply an expression of the president’s persona, which can exude a certain level of incivility in order to show who’s the boss. The president would likely say it works, too. 

Still, reports suggest some on Trump’s staff believe Twitter will be the president’s undoing. Some staffers reportedly think the president’s tweets should be vetted by lawyers. Some have complained that the president blocking people on Twitter is unconstitutional. 

It’s all very well politicians and others complaining, but is anyone going to do anything about it? Is anyone truly in a position to do anything about it, whether the tweets sound presidential or not? 

White House spokesman Sean Spicer has previously confirmed that Trump’s tweets are “official statements by the president.”

Is it therefore official presidential policy to call women crazy and insult their intelligence? 

That’s what we seem to have come to.

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