Tickets please! We built Lego’s adorable London Bus – CNET

All aboard the Lego Bus!

Lego’s latest set is a classic Routemaster-style London Bus. Made of 1686 pieces, measuring 7 inches (18cm) high, 13 inches (34cm) long and 4 inches (10cm) wide, it took roughly 4 hours to build.

Part of the “Creator” series, this double decker will set you back £110, $140 or AU$200. It’s exclusively available in London Lego stores until August when it will be available to order online. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

CNET editor Andrew Hoyle is building the bottom deck and Jonathan Garnham (pictured) is making the top.

We’re armed with mugs of Yorkshire Tea, countless bags of Lego and hundreds of pages of instructions. Lets build!

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

As with most large sets, the bags are numbered so you don’t have to open them all at once and won’t waste time rummaging around in search of the correct piece. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Lego bricks and curves don’t usually mix well. The bus is fairly rectangular but many of the corners and edges are curved, requiring some ingenious sideways building.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

No sharp right angles on the back end of this bus.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

28 stickers are included. To get them on straight and neat, use the perfected Garnham technique of carefully lowering the sticker onto the brick with an official Lego Brick separator. You’re welcome.

And yes, they’ve included one in the box. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Andrew built the charming spiral staircase and the fire extinguisher cabinet — which hopefully won’t be required.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Your minifigure can relax on any of these 14 top deck seats. You’ll need to build each one individually before fixing them in place.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Once it’s completed, you can lift the bonnet (or hood) of the bus to reveal this perfect miniature six-cylinder diesel engine.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Oh no! My brolly is all wet from this blasted drizzle. I don’t want to get my suit wet when I sit down…

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Phew! I can store it in the umbrella holder.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Oh to be a bus driver in the greatest city in the world.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The attention to detail is incredible.

Who left this bubble gum under the seat?

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

This seat needs urgent reupholstering. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

A lovely detail: This set’s unique code number (10258) is on the number plate.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

All aboard the number 9 bus to Brickston, only stopping at Yellow Brick Road, Brickadilly Circus and Two by Two Square. 

Unfortunately I need to get to Brickingham Palace pronto. I better cab it over there so I can deliver the queen’s biscuits. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Lowering the top deck onto the bottom. A ceremonious moment.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Concentrate!

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

There were only 10 studs to line up, but I still managed to make a meal of it. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

And it’s done! Next stop, Brickadilly Circus.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Look! It wants to be a real bus.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

Ding! Ding!

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These bus drivers think they can park wherever they bloody well like.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The Routemaster demonstrates its famous lack of speed.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The Routemaster is ideally suited to tackling London’s streets.

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

But we’re not sure there’s enough room for this man’s luggage. 

Photo by: Andrew Hoyle/CNET

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